Fly Fishing Links
& Resources

PHWFF

The Hook & Hackle Company encourages support of those "Wounded Warriors" who have suffered physical and/or emotional injury as a result of their service to our great country.

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Rose River Farm, Virginia's finest private water trout fishing experience, has just gotten even better. Now in addition to over a mile of private water managed for Trophy Trout (all strictly on the fly and catch and release) they have added luxury rental cabins. As an introductory special ....

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PHWFF

The Hook & Hackle Company highly endorses this fine bonefish, tarpon & permit fishing destination. Our recent visit there exceeded our expectations many times over.

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PHWFF

Nora's colorful artwork just blow's me away! Best known for her watercolors, Nora has spent time painting on location all over the U.S.

 

I recently purchased a couple of prints from her Rich Pool Series which have become instant favorites!

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From time to time, we will feature different folks who are making a difference to fly fishing, conservation, outdoor art, helping others & so on. We welcome your suggestions for this column.


Peter C. Thompson, artist, writer, fly fisher & conservationist is our current feature.

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Wilderness North – Ontario Canada’s Premier Fly-in Adventure Provider!

Deep in the heart of the Northern Ontario wilderness lies an oasis for outdoor enthusiasts and anglers seeking a definitive Canadian adventure. Accessible only by floatplane, Wilderness North offers a haven for those who want to reconnect with nature.

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Waders & Boots!

Your source for flyfishing and flycraft resources since 1975.

Chest waders are either made of neoprene material or a more lightweight breathable fabric. You can buy them with the boots attached or "stocking foot" versions which mean you'll need to purchase boots separately.

The neoprene waders will keep you warmer so if you do much fishing in colder water or colder air temperatures, you want to consider these. You can also buy lightweight waders that are big enough to fit layers of warm clothing underneath. Either method is fine.

Boots have to fit correctly. I wouldn't spend much time worrying about style and features, as they're all pretty much alike. Again, just get what fits. You will usually have to go up a full size from your regular shoe size to accomodate for the bootie, which is usually neoprene in all waders.

You can also purchase hip waders which can be easier to use for quick fishing trips. Also, they're usually pretty tough so if your in rough foilage and you don't expect to encounter water over the knees, these could be the way to do. For the small streams near where I fish the most, I usually just grab my hippers and go. They're tougher in heavy brush too.

Traditionally, the bottoms of fly fishing boots have a layer of felt which provides for better footing on slippery surfaces, like moss covered rocks. They work well, but it is now widely believed that they aid in the spread of ANS (Aquatic Nuisance Species) from water to water when you fish different locations. You can learn more about ANS here.

'Sticky' rubber soles are beginning to replace the felt soles, but they are considered a bit less effective than the felt. I'm sure there will be new developments of these soles in the near future.

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